Coping with Cancer Costs: Surveys and Video Conferencing

After a cancer diagnosis, our finances can go into a tailspin. There are co-payments, treatments, medications not covered, and travel expenses. Add to that if you have been placed on disability retirement, and your bank account may have seen a new low. So what do you do to help maintain expenses if you are unable to work or if the expenses are too high?

Sharing your patient perspective

Many organizations perform surveys and video conference calls with patients for their point of view on different topics. Many people shy away from this as they are afraid to give away private information, BUT the only information you give them is your name and address so they can mail you a check – a check? REAL MONEY.

I have been on disability retirement for 4 years and 8 months. I can honestly tell you that if it wasn’t for these surveys I would be living in a box downtown. Full truth!

A survey a few times a month

Don’t be afraid to respond if you see a post about a company looking for people to participate in a survey. You simply register on their website. Be sure to include all pertinent information about your disease. They will never call you; however, a couple times a month, you might receive an email asking you to take a 20-minute survey online. These typically take me 10 minutes, and within a few weeks, a $35.00 check arrives in the mail.

Participating in video conference calls

There are also 3rd party organizations that do periodically have other patients post on Facebook looking for people to participate in their video conference calls. A normal phone call is nothing more than watching a few “commercials” and giving your input as to whether it would catch your attention. This is not a pass or fail – this is only your opinion. They also never ask personal information other than the stage of your disease and what treatments you have had.

Leading to other opportunities

I am so special that I have Lung Cancer and Bladder Cancer, two totally different and unrelated cancers, so I am able to participate in both types of surveys. An average video conference will last 60 minutes, and then they will pay you anywhere between $100 and $150. Sometimes, as a result of a survey you’ve done, you may even be asked to attend different conferences. Several months ago, after a survey that paid me $150, I was invited to attend a conference in Texas. It was Quest Laboratories national sales conference for the week. Every Oncology Sales Representative was in attendance. I was asked to speak to them about my journey. It was simple, painless and they paid all the expenses. Including the $15.00 lunch at the airport – yikes 🙂

So when you see something that resembles this:
Looking for Stage II or III patients who have not been on immunotherapy to participate in a video conference. You will receive payment for your time.

Don’t automatically look away! You might consider responding with your email or phone number so you can get more information. It is a great way to add dollars to your bank account!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The BladderCancer.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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